With June being Alzihimers Awareness Month, we at Burlington Health Care desire do all we can to bring awareness to this disease and those it affects. If you are caring for a loved one with Alzihimers, we are here for you to help you make home a safer place to live or to help with selection of necessary supplies, or help point you in the right direction to answers to your questions.

The information in the following blog will be gathered from www.alz.org, a website that we highly recommend for more information on Alzheimers.

The numbers are staggering and can not be ignored.

Per www.alz.org

An estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2018. This number includes an estimated 5.5 million people age 65 and older and approximately 200,000 individuals under age 65 who have younger-onset Alzheimer’s.

One in 10 people age 65 and older (10 percent) has Alzheimer’s dementia.

Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women.

Older African-Americans are about twice as likely to have Alzheimer’s or other dementias as older whites.

Hispanics are about one and one-half times as likely to have Alzheimer’s or other dementias as older whites.

As the number of older Americans grows rapidly, so too will the numbers of new and existing cases of Alzheimer’s. Today, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s every 65 seconds. By mid-century, someone in the United States will develop the disease every 33 seconds.

Alzheimer’s disease is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed.

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States, and the fifth-leading cause of death among those age 65 and older. It also is a leading cause of disability and poor health.

Although deaths from other major causes have decreased significantly, official records indicate that deaths from Alzheimer’s disease have increased significantly. Between 2000 and 2015, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease as recorded on death certificates increased 123 percent, while deaths from the number one cause of death (heart disease) decreased 11 percent.

Among people age 70, 61 percent of those with Alzheimer’s are expected to die before the age of 80 compared with 30 percent of people without Alzheimer’s — a rate twice as high.

Who are the caregivers?

About one in three caregivers (34 percent) is age 65 or older.

Approximately two-thirds of caregivers are women; more specifically, over one-third of dementia caregivers are daughters.

Approximately one-quarter of dementia caregivers are “sandwich generation” caregivers — meaning that they care not only for an aging parent, but also for children under age 18.

Alzheimer’s takes a devastating toll on caregivers. Compared with caregivers of people without dementia, twice as many caregivers of those with dementia indicate substantial emotional, financial and physical difficulties.

Of the total lifetime cost of caring for someone with dementia, 70 percent is borne by families — either through out-of-pocket health and long-term care expenses or from the value of unpaid care.

Alzheimer’s places a huge burden on the health care system, with annual costs exceeding a quarter of a trillion dollars.

In 2018, the direct costs to American society of caring for those with Alzheimer’s will total an estimated $277 billion, including $186 billion in Medicare and Medicaid payments. Unless something is done, in 2050, Alzheimer’s is projected to cost more than $1.1 trillion (in 2018 dollars). This dramatic rise includes more than four-fold increases both in government spending under Medicare and Medicaid and in out-of-pocket spending.

The costs of health care and long-term care for individuals with Alzheimer’s or other dementias are substantial. Dementia is one of the costliest conditions to society.

People with Alzheimer’s or other dementias have twice as many hospital stays per year as other older people.

Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s or other dementias are more likely than those without dementia to have other chronic conditions.

People with Alzheimer’s or other dementias make up a large proportion of all elderly people who receive adult day services and nursing home care.

For more regarding this information and more statistics on Alzheimers visit www.alz.org. If you are in the Northern Kentucky Area and need assistance with equipment, supplies and support for your loved one with Alzheimers, give us a call at Burlington Health Care. We are here to help you.